College Class opportunities at YVHS

By: Kahlan Matthews

As a sophomore at Yampa Valley High School, I wouldn’t have expected to be offered to take a class at Steamboat’s local college, Colorado Mountain College (CMC). Usually, these classes are only offered to juniors and seniors, so I’m sure you can understand why I was caught off guard. Most students probably wouldn’t be very excited about getting to take yet another class, especially at a college level, but I feel very privileged to have this opportunity, and for free!

For my class, I’ve chosen Interpersonal Communication. This is a big step in the right direction for me, and the class will give me high school, and college credits. It is called dual enrollment.

YVHS offers, and encourages classes like these to every student in their junior or senior year, and certain sophomores like me. As I stated in my last paragraph, these classes are completely free, as long as the student passes the class. They give you early preparation for college and a chance at an early graduation in High School.

During an interview with the Dean of my school, Chuck Rosemond, he said that “The kids have to be able to function in a college environment, which means no high school antics, and what it does is expose them to the college world and hopefully inspires them to pursue their education after high school.”

There is a variety of classes and levels for students to take. YVHS is preparing its students for the real world in more ways than one, but I think that the college classes are the most prominent. All the students have to do is find a way up to the college, which the free Yellow Line bus here in Steamboat Springs helps with.

Chuck has also filled me in on how YVHS has changed since the classes have been offered, saying “Since we’ve been offering the CMC classes at YVHS we have not only given our students the opportunity to have a unique educational opportunity while still in high school, but at the same time it’s created a dynamic in our school that I feel has raised the bar, and when that becomes a topic of conversation it gets our kids to shoot higher.”

In the future of YVHS and other schools, I hope to see lots more students working their hardest to get the pay off in a way like I have. Early college gets you an early start and a better outlook on what life will be like. Trying your hardest to get opportunities like this will really pay off. In the long run, it will prepare students for life by easing them into what comes after you graduate. YVHS and these classes help students instead of throwing the students into life without any practice.

I have faith that with enough time and effort, the town of Steamboat will see more high school teens getting prepared for life, and maybe even see the school of YVHS in a better light. This class and the many to come have opened my eyes to the possibility of a brighter future.

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The Adventures Make All the Difference at YVHS

By Jack Ringer

The Yampa Valley High School does these trips to amazing places. They are overnight field trips around Colorado. YVHS takes three trips; one in the fall, winter and spring. The reason that YVHS goes on the trips is that the school likes to try and put the students in an alternative learning environment. The students are enthusiastic about the trips because other schools don’t get to do these trips and they engage the students on a different level.

As a school, Yampa Valley High School does a lot of things people would never know. The school goes on three different trips to North Routt, Denver and Buena Vista.

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In the fall YVHS goes to Steamboat Lake in North Routt and explores the area. The highlight of the trip is a hike up to the top of Hahn’s Peak, one of the most challenging hikes in the area.

The school goes on an Urban trip to Denver in the winter. They explore some colleges and go watch a play.

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In the spring YVHS goes to Buena Vista to raft and does a high ropes course. Whitewater rafting on the Arkansas River is a thrilling experience for the students and staff as well. This is an end of the year trip for the Yampa Valley High School. The students enjoy the trips and find it a cool way to learn.

YVHS student Kyle Case said,”I like to climb cliffs and take pictures on the camping trips.”  

He went on to say he likes Urban Intensive the most. Yampa Valley High School also does things like play football or even fishing.

Senior Ezra Tebbenkamp said, “I enjoy school more after the intensives because it lets the kids connect more and it makes the school more of a family rather than a normal school setting.”

Junior Seth Caldwell said, “On my spare time on the intensives I like to hacky sack, hike and hang out in my tent and chill.” He also said. “Although the nature is beautiful and you can collect yourself, I still like the urban intensive more.”

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The Urban Intensive is where the school goes to Denver and then goes to a couple colleges and explore them for a while. Then, we go to a hotel, dress up, and then go to a theatre play. After the play we go back to the hotel for free time.

The school goes on these trips because they like to change the environment and get a break from academics.

YVHS Dean Chuck Rosemond said, “They are unique, fun experiences. I like the students and the teachers more on these trips because people can connect. I feel that the students take away the fact that they’re closer to the staff and their peers.”

The students feel that these trips are fun and it helps with making the kids happier because they get a break away from school.

Junior Colter Christensen said, “I hope these trips are around forever so that there will be more fun to have.”

Does the Snow Affect our Town’s Economy?

By Tommy Davis

Any local in Steamboat Springs knows that our town’s economy is reliant on tourism, but the real question here is how much does the amount of snow that we get during winter affect our economy’s success? 

One would hope to find that the amount of snow that the town of Steamboat Springs receives during the winter has a direct correlation with the economy’s health.

The research, however, suggests otherwise. In comparing the total amount of annual sales tax against the total amount of annual snowfall one can find that the amount of snowfall has little to no correlation with the economy.

The year in which the highest amount of sales taxes were collected was 2016 with a total amount of $23,380,341. The total amount of snowfall for 2016 was 335 inches, about 20 inches below average for the past ten years. The year with the lowest amount of sales tax was 2010, with a total of $16,612,266 also had a slightly below average amount of snowfall with a total of 311 inches. This sudden drop in sales tax may be caused by the recession after the 2008 election. If we look at the statistics from December, one of the busiest months of the ski season, we should ideally see a correlation between the amount of snow and the collected sales tax, however looking at the data we can see that, like the annual sales tax and snow, the amount of snow during December has no effect on the sales tax.

From the research conducted one can conclude that the amount of snowfall has little to no effect on our town’s economy. So the next time you look outside in late December and see no snow, don’t panic. The town’s economy should do just fine thanks to Summer tourism.

 

Year December Sales tax Total December Snowfall in inches Total Annual Sales Tax Total Annual Snowfall
2016 $3,058,065 101 in. $23,380,341 335 in.
2015 $2,991,811 105 in. $21,873,689 223 in.
2014 $2,745,001 57 in. $20,619,523 272 in.
2013 $2,503,947 62 in. $18,898,046 308 in.
2012 $2,235,168 139 in. $17,617,674 321 in.
2011 $2,340,374 30 in. $17,388,015 286 in.
2010 $2,231,190 72 in. $16,612,266 311 in.
2009 $2,130,350 45 in. $16,710,291 289 in.
2008 $2,353,783 100 in. $19,903,762 405 in.
2007 $2,558,940 126 in. $19,744,829 489 in.
2006 $2,378,514 49 in. $18,184,375 313 in.

Sources: https://www.onthesnow.com/colorado/steamboat/historical-snowfall.html?&v=graph#view

http://steamboatsprings.net/DocumentCenter/Home/Index/14

Off Roading In Colorado

By Tatum Wall

Off-roading in Colorado can be a lot of fun, but knowing where, how, and when is huge in this hobby. I picked a few of my favourite places in Colorado that range in different difficulty levels.

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The first is an easy entry-level road, named Baxter Pass, located by Dinosaur Park. It is recommended to have a 4X4 vehicle because there are some rocks and all dirt. Also, it isn’t necessary to have a lift kit, but it is recommended to have. A lift kit is a bigger suspension that gives you more clearance of obstacles and to give you more room to get bigger tires.  It is open from June to October, but some areas of the trail may be blocked off between that time due to road work or weather.

The next area is Trough Trail, located by Kremmling, CO. It is rated as a very difficult trail due to the very steep incline in the 1.1 mile trail including big rocks. It was man-made back in 2002 created for extreme off-road vehicles. It will take about three hours to go through the main trail. It does require a permit. You can get one of these permits at the in the city of Boulder. There is going to possibly be body damage and internal damage to the vehicle due to the terrain of the roads.

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Green Ridge Road is the third and longest trail on this list. It is located by the Roosevelt National Forest in Colorado.   It is rated as a difficult trail to get through. It is a long trail with deep mud holes and embedded rocks to surely give you trouble and fun. Most of the trail goes through dense trees with the occasional openings to beautiful meadows. Anyone in a dirt bike or ATV will be covered from head to toe in mud.  It is typically open from July 1st to November 20th, but opening day is commonly delayed due to deep mud holes from winter melting. There are some camping places at the beginning of the trail. This is not a trail for stock SUVs, and don’t travel alone nor without another vehicle. The worst of the mud is in the beginning.  

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Imogene Pass is located in Telluride, CO. It is the second highest drivable trail in Colorado.  At Savage Basin, you’ll pass through Tomboy Townsite, it was one of most active mining towns in Colorado. A great deal of mining debris is still scattered about. Most are on private property. The pass is blocked by snow until it is ploughed, usually in early July. Unlicensed vehicles are not permitted on the lower half of Southside and you must start the trail from Camp Bird Road. The road is rocky, steep and narrow in places and passing can be dangerous. Stock SUVs should have low-range gearing, 4-wheel drive, high clearance and skid plates.

I called the Forest Service and I asked them how they feel about off-roading. They said, “It is a great opportunity to have fun with their 4wd vehicle but stay on the trail.  causes resource damage to road and life when the vehicles go off the trail. A good place to get more information on this subject is www.staythetrail.org.”

The Search for Steamboat’s Best Chocolate Chip Cookie.

By Seth Cadwell

I, personally am a cookie fanatic and eat cookies basically every day. So, naturally, I wanted to find the best tasting cookie for a good price. I narrowed it down to the best chocolate cookie in the bakeries in Steamboat. I went to four different bakeries in Steamboat including Freshies, Mountain brew, Smell That Bread, and Off The Beaten Path.

I decided to have a few categories for rating these cookies. The first one is the most important, which is softness of the cookie. Whether I can bite into it and have it melt into my mouth or does it break into a bunch of pieces and leave crumbs everywhere. The next category is the amount of chocolate, which goes into the next one which is the type of chocolate. The last one is the size of the cookie.

The first place I went to was Mountain Brew at 427 oak street. I went around 3:00 P.M.  in the afternoon so, the cookies were made a while ago. The cookies were a little brittle, but still pretty soft. They put a lot of milk chocolate in them which I appreciate a lot. The cookies were pretty large, but not too big, about the size of my palm.  I would say that the overall taste of the cookie was a 7/10. It was a little brittle, but it would have been better if I went earlier in the day.

The second place I went was Off The Beaten Path 68 9th St. This one was one of my favourites for sure. I showed up earlier than I did with Mountain Brew and these tasted just like they came out of the oven. Really warm and the chocolate would melt in your mouth. It was dark chocolate. They did not put too much chocolate in it but it was still pretty good

The third place I went to was Freshies Restaurant 595 S Lincoln Ave. I thought that this cookie was especially soft.  It was milk chocolate and they put just the right amount of chocolate to cookie ratio.  This was definitely the bigger cookie, but the cost was higher so it evens itself out. All in all, I give this cookie a 9/10.

The last place I went to was Smell That Bread, which is located at 135 11th St.  Their cookie was a little pricey for what I was expecting. The cookie wasn’t warm so it was pretty dry, but wasn’t super crumby which was a plus. It was milk chocolate which they put a pretty good amount of into the cookie.  This one was about the size of the Mountain Brew Cookie. It is a little hard to give a good size comparison. I would give this one a 7/10.

After going to most of the bakeries in Steamboat I have come up with the best cookie.  It was hard to find the best cookie because they were all different prices and sizes, but I think I figured it out. Tied for third is Mountain Brew and Smell That Bread. Both of these cookies were not bad I just thought they were a little dry for how expensive they both were. In second place was Freshies cookie. The price was a little expensive, but the cookie was fantastic. And now what we have all been waiting for,  the best cookie in steamboat is, Off The Beaten Path! This cookie was by far the softest cookie, right when I sunk my teeth into the soft dough there was an explosion of dark chocolate straight to my taste buds.

Moving On: Graduating Senior Ezra Tebbenkamp

By Hayden Entress

Senior year is a time of reflection and preparation. The future can be an intimidating thing to think about for seniors, but, it can also be exciting and motivating.

Ezra Tebbenkamp, an 18 year old senior at Yampa Valley High School, is planning the next steps in his life after graduation. He has realized that this means embracing new responsibilities and challenges. Millions of high school seniors have to go through this process of letting go, moving on, becoming an adult and realizing what is important to them. For Ezra, although he wishes he would have started thinking about these things earlier, he still has goals and ambitions for his future.

Ezra´s high school experience shows that there is more than one way to go through high school. He has had different experiences at several schools that have helped shape who he is today.

Ezra started high school at Steamboat Springs High School.  He then did a year of online school, but after realizing that those were not a good fit for him, he willingly decided to give Yampa Valley High School a try.

¨ I started out at the public high school and that wasn’t going so well. So, I left in the second semester of my sophomore year and started doing homeschool. I did homeschool for my sophomore year and the beginning of my junior year, but I was not doing well so. Since I was not doing well, my mom had the idea to put me in the alternative school. So far it has been a really good experience. It was my own choice to Yampa Valley High School even though my Mom brought it up first,” said Ezra.

Yampa Valley High School has helped Ezra to see the potential in his future.

“They (YVHS) have reminded me that I can do well in school. When I was a freshman, I just messed around a lot and didn’t care about school. And I skipped lots of classes. Now I am realizing that it is important to go to classes and try to get good grades. And YVHS makes that possible,” said Ezra.

Ezra´s plans after he graduates include going to the New Mexico Firefighting Academy and getting his own apartment, which he will be able to pay for himself.

¨I am going to have some new responsibilities like paying rent and buying my own food. I think I am going to realize all of the things I should have known once I am totally independent,” said Ezra. After he graduates from the academy, he is going to find a department to work at.

Some other goals that Ezra has are to have a steady and reliable income and be able to have money to retire with. Ezra knows that goals are an important part of staying focused and for succeeding after he graduates.

Ezra said, “If I don’t have goals I will just mess around and do pointless stuff.”

In his earlier high school years, Ezra did not know what he wanted his life to be like after he graduated.

When asked when he started thinking about what life was going to look like after high school, Ezra replied,  “It took me longer than it should have. At the end of my junior year, I was thinking I about how I should probably figure out what I am going to do. I wish I would have thought about it sooner.”

Ezra is looking forward to being able to go out into the world to accomplish his goals and make them a reality. He wants to be able to look back at his hard work in high school and feel accomplished.

Other than his friends and family, Ezra will not miss high school.

“It will be nice to create my own schedule. I’m ready for something new,”  said Ezra.

Ezra hopes that his story can motivate, inspire or help students who are getting ready to graduate.

Some words of advice from Ezra to other students are, “I would say to think about what you are going to do after high school before your senior year. I think I waited too long and now it is a lot more stressful.”

Ezra is ready to accomplish his goals and to move on to new, exciting things. One of the most important things that Ezra has learned in high school is that procrastination does not work. It is better and easier to just do your work and to not get behind.

“Being a senior puts the steps I need to take to accomplish my goals into perspective. It makes them more clear because the future is becoming a reality.”

Moving On: Graduating Senior Hayden Entress

By Ezra Tebbenkamp

All adults remember the feelings of their senior year coming to an end and having to began to think and provide for themselves and survive in the real world. Some people transition smoothly from high school and others have trouble. I think that the idea of transitioning from high school to the real world can be scary and overwhelming, so I sat down with a fellow student, Hayden Entress, who is also graduating this year and asked how she felt high school had been for her, and what she’s been feeling as we reach our second semester.

Hayden Entress is a student currently finishing her high school education as a senior attending Yampa Valley High School(YVHS).  Ms Entrance has many big goals for her life as an adult, and as the end of her final year comes steadily closer she is beginning to realize the steps she will have to take to achieve these goals. Hayden has enjoyed her high school experience for the majority, but it’s time for her to leave her home, memories and family to start her own adventure.

As a freshman Hayden attended the Steamboat Mountain School for the purpose of pursuing her love for ski racing. After two years of this, however, she suffered a severe knee injury.

“I was frustrated and upset after my accident,” Hayden told me.

A combination of realizing that she wouldn’t be able to ski the next year and the strenuous amount of time needed to complete classes at the Mountain School soon had Hayden looking for a new school.

“At first I looked into both the alternative school (YVHS) and the regular public high school. In a follow-up appointment she was told by her doctor she would have to undergo an important surgery which would have her missing too much school to successfully attend the Yampa Valley High School or Steamboat Springs High School (SSHS).  With the only other real option for Hayden being online school, she completed her junior year at home on a computer.

After finishing her junior year at home Hayden decided the come to the Yampa Valley High School.

When I asked why, She answered, “I like the way the YVHS is run with their curriculum and schedule, along with the small classroom environment.” Now that Hayden is attending YVHS and has had time to experience it firsthand for herself she says that she enjoys, “No homework and the personal time to think about what I want to do after high school. It also frees up more time for activities I enjoy doing.”

Hayden shared with me that after high school she would like to become apart of the medical field including, specific interests in bio and neuroscience.

When I asked her how her parents had influenced her decision making regarding plans after high school she replied, “”They have been very supportive in my decision making, but has felt some pressure to look at certain colleges.”

Hayden told me she knows things will change when she no longer lives under her parent’s roof and realizes that there will be new challenges that she must face.

When I asked Hayden what she felt she was most excited and worried about for the future without the parental guidance she answered, “I’m definitely worried about finances and the responsibilities of being on my own, but also excited for the chance the manage my own schedule and time”

If Hayden could go back and give herself any advice at the beginning of her high school adventure she said, “I  would tell her- don’t doubt yourself because if you doubt yourself then you won’t accomplish your dreams, set the bar high.”

Hayden still has a long adventurous journey ahead of her, but with her continued hard work and dedication she can reach any goal she sets. This will all continue at BYU-Idaho pursuing what life has planned next.